Extra virgin olive oil

  • Bisignano, G., Tomaino, A., Cascio, R. L., Crisafi, G., Uccella, N., & Saija, A. (1999). On the in‐vitro antimicrobial activity of oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol. Journal of pharmacy and pharmacology, 51(8), 971-974.                                
  • Budiyanto, A., Ahmed, N. U., Wu, A., Bito, T., Nikaido, O., Osawa, T., ... & Ichihashi, M. (2000). Protective effect of topically applied olive oil against photocarcinogenesis following UVB exposure of mice. Carcinogenesis, 21(11), 2085-2090.                                   
  • D’Angelo et al., 2005.  Hydroxytyrosol, a natural antioxidant from olive oil, prevents protein damage induced by long-wave ultraviolet radiation in melanoma cells. Free Radic Biol Med. 38(7):908-18.
  • Eidi, A., Moghadam-kia, S., Moghadam, J. Z., Eidi, M., & Rezazadeh, S. (2012). Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of olive oil (Olea europeae L.) in mice. Pharmaceutical biology, 50(3), 332-337.                              
  • Ganceviciene et al. 2012. Skin anti-aging strategies. Dermatoendocrinol. 4(3): 308-319                                  
  • Hussain at al. 2017. Phytotherapeutic potential of natural herbal medicines for the treatment of mild-to-severe atopic dermatitis: A review of human clinical studies. Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy 93: 596–608                                
  • Ichihashi, M., Ahmed, N. U., Budiyanto, A., Wu, A., Bito, T., Ueda, M., & Osawa, T. (2000). Preventive effect of antioxidant on ultraviolet-induced skin cancer in mice. Journal of Dermatological Science, 23, S45-S50.                                    
  • Kiechl‐Kohlendorfer, U., Berger, C., & Inzinger, R. (2008). The effect of daily treatment with an olive oil/lanolin emollient on skin integrity in preterm infants: a randomized controlled trial. Pediatric dermatology, 25(2), 174-178.                                      
  • Lopez, S., Bermudez, B., Montserrat-de la Paz, S., Jaramillo, S., Varela, L. M., Ortega-Gomez, A., ... & Muriana, F. J. (2014). Membrane composition and dynamics: a target of bioactive virgin olive oil constituents. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA)-Biomembranes, 1838(6), 1638-1656.                                            
  •  Newmark, H. L. (1997). Squalene, olive oil, and cancer risk: a review and hypothesis. Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Biomarkers, 6(12), 1101-1103.                                     
  • Owen, R. W., Giacosa, A., Hull, W. E., Haubner, R., Würtele, G., Spiegelhalder, B., & Bartsch, H. (2000). Olive-oil consumption and health: the possible role of antioxidants. The lancet oncology, 1(2), 107-112.                                            
  • Rahmani, A. H., Albutti, A. S., & Aly, S. M. (2014). Therapeutics role of olive fruits/oil in the prevention of diseases via modulation of anti-oxidant, anti-tumour and genetic activity. International journal of clinical and experimental medicine, 7(4), 799.                                  
  • Smith, P. P., & Leith, J. T. (1977). Effects of topically-applied olive oil on the response of hamster skin to single or multiple doses of 230 kV X-rays. International Journal of Radiation Biology and Related Studies in Physics, Chemistry and Medicine, 31(5), 467-475.                                      
  • Viola, P., & Viola, M. (2009). Virgin olive oil as a fundamental nutritional component and skin protector. Clinics in dermatology, 27(2), 159-165.                                           
  • Visioli, F., & Galli, C. (2002). Biological properties of olive oil phytochemicals. Critical reviews in food science and nutrition, 42(3), 209-221.                                        
  • Visioli, F., Bellosta, S., & Galli, C. (1998). Oleuropein, the bitter principle of olives, enhances nitric oxide production by mouse macrophages. Life sciences, 62(6), 541-546.                               

Beeswax

  • Abdulrhman, M., Samir Elbarbary, N., Ahmed Amin, D., & Saeid Ebrahim, R. (2012). Honey and a mixture of honey, beeswax, and olive oil–propolis extract in treatment of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: a randomized controlled pilot study. Pediatric hematology and oncology, 29(3), 285-292.                                          
  • Al‐Waili, N. S. (2005). Clinical and mycological benefits of topical application of honey, olive oil and beeswax in diaper dermatitis. Clinical microbiology and infection, 11(2), 160-163.                                   
  • Attama, A. A., & Müller-Goymann, C. C. (2008). Effect of beeswax modification on the lipid matrix and solid lipid nanoparticle crystallinity. Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 315(1), 189-195.                                  
  • Bogdanov, S. Beeswax: History, Uses and Trade. Online Beeswax Book.                                 
  • Degner, S. C., Papoutsis, A. J., & Romagnolo, D. F. (2009). Health benefits of traditional culinary and medicinal Mediterranean plants. Complementary and alternative therapies and the aging population. New York: E-Publishing Inc. p, 541-62.           
  • Fagundes, C., Palou, L., Monteiro, A. R., & Pérez-Gago, M. B. (2014). Effect of antifungal hydroxypropyl methylcellulose-beeswax edible coatings on gray mold development and quality attributes of cold-stored cherry tomato fruit. Postharvest biology and technology, 92, 1-8.                                            
  • Fratini, F., Cilia, G., Turchi, B., & Felicioli, A. (2016). Beeswax: a minireview of its antimicrobial activity and its application in medicine. Asian Pacific journal of tropical medicine, 9(9), 839-843.                                            
  • Lewis, P. A., Wright, K., Webster, A., Steer, M., Rudd, M., Doubrovsky, A., & Gardner, G. (2012). A randomized controlled pilot study comparing aqueous cream with a beeswax and herbal oil cream in the provision of relief from postburn pruritis. Journal of Burn Care & Research, 33(4), e195-e200.                                      
  • Ming, L. C., Ang, W. C., Yang, Q., Thitilertdecha, P., Wong, T. W., & Khan, T. M. (2016). Cosmeceuticals: Safety, Efficacy and Potential Benefits. Recent Advances in Drug Delivery Technology, 287.                                          
  • Zhai, H., Willard, P., & Maibach, H. I. (1998). Evaluating skin‐protective materials against contact irritants and allergens. Contact dermatitis, 38(3), 155-158.                                         

Urtica dioica leaf extract 

  • Awad, E., Austin, D., & Lyndon, A. R. (2013). Effect of black cumin seed oil (Nigella sativa) and nettle extract (Quercetin) on enhancement of immunity in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum). Aquaculture, 388, 193-197.                               
  • Baronets NG, Adlova GP, Mel'nikova VA. [Effect of medicinal plant extracts on the growth of microorganisms]. Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2001 Sep-Oct;(5):71-2. Russian.                  
  • Bnouham, M., Merhfour, F. Z., Ziyyat, A., Mekhfi, H., Aziz, M., & Legssyer, A. (2003). Antihyperglycemic activity of the aqueous extract of Urtica dioica. Fitoterapia, 74(7), 677-681.                                            
  • Chrubasik, J. E., Roufogalis, B. D., Wagner, H., & Chrubasik, S. A. (2007). A comprehensive review on nettle effect and efficacy profiles, Part I: herba urticae. Phytomedicine, 14(6), 423-435.                                            
  • Johnson et al. 2013, Lipophilic stinging nettle extracts possess potent anti-inflammatory activity, are not cytotoxic and may be superior to traditional tinctures for treating inflammatory disorders. Phytomedicine; 20(2): 143-147                                          
  • Julia E. Chrubasik, Basil D. Roufogalis, Hildebert Wagner, Sigrun Chrubasik, A comprehensive review on the stinging nettle effect and efficacy profiles. Part II: Urticae radix, Phytomedicine, Volume 14, Issue 7, 2007, Pages 568-579, ISSN 0944-7113, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.phymed.2007.03.014.                                          
  • Klingelhoefer, S., Obertreis, B., Quast, S., & Behnke, B. (1999). Antirheumatic effect of IDS 23, a stinging nettle leaf extract, on in vitro expression of T helper cytokines. The Journal of rheumatology, 26(12), 2517-2522.                                         
  • Knipping K, Garssen J, van't Land B. An evaluation of the inhibitory effects against rotavirus infection of edible plant extracts. Virol J. 2012 Jul 26;9:137. doi: 10.1186/1743-422X-9-137.                                            
  • Körpe DA, Işerı OD, Sahin FI, Cabi E, Haberal M. High-antibacterial activity of Urtica spp. seed extracts on food and plant pathogenic bacteria. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2013 May;64(3):355-62. doi: 10.3109/09637486.2012.734290. Epub 2012 Oct 16.                                    
  • Namazi, N., Tarighat, A., & Bahrami, A. (2012). The effect of hydro alcoholic nettle (Urtica dioica) extract on oxidative stress in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized double-blind clinical trial. Pakistan journal of biological sciences: PJBS, 15(2), 98-102.                              
  • Roschek, B., Fink, R. C., McMichael, M., & Alberte, R. S. (2009). Nettle extract (Urtica dioica) affects key receptors and enzymes associated with allergic rhinitis. Phytotherapy research, 23(7), 920-926.                                           
  • Schneider, T., & Rübben, H. (2004). Stinging nettle root extract (Bazoton-uno) in long term treatment of benign prostatic syndrome (BPS). Results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled multicenter study after 12 months. Der Urologe. Ausg. A, 43(3), 302-306.                                      
  • Testai L, Chericoni S, Calderone V, Nencioni G, Nieri P, Morelli I, Martinotti E. Cardiovascular effects of Urtica dioica L. (Urticaceae) roots extracts: in vitro and in vivo pharmacological studies. J Ethnopharmacol. 2002 Jun;81(1):105-9.                                            
  • Turker AU, Usta C. Biological screening of some Turkish medicinal plant extracts for antimicrobial and toxicity activities. Nat Prod Res. 2008 Jan 20;22(2):136-46.                                      
  • Upton R.H. Dayu, 2013. Stinging nettles leaf (Urtica dioica L.): Extraordinary vegetable medicine. Journal of Herbal Medicine. 9-38                                           

Lavander (Lavandula angustifolia) essential oil

  • Cavanagh, H. M., & Wilkinson, J. M. (2002). Biological activities of lavender essential oil. Phytotherapy research, 16.4: 301-308.
  • Cavanagh, H. M., & Wilkinson, J. M. (2005). Lavender essential oil: a review. Australian infection control, 10(1), 35-37.
  • D'auria, F. D., Tecca, M., Strippoli, V., Salvatore, G., Battinelli, L., & Mazzanti, G. (2005). Antifungal activity of Lavandula angustifolia essential oil against Candida albicans yeast and mycelial form. Medical mycology, 43(5), 391-396.
  • Evandri, M. G., Battinelli, L., Daniele, C., Mastrangelo, S., Bolle, P., & Mazzanti, G. (2005). The antimutagenic activity of Lavandula angustifolia (lavender) essential oil in the bacterial reverse mutation assay. Food and chemical toxicology, 43(9), 1381-1387.
  • Ghelardini, C., Galeotti, N., Salvatore, G., & Mazzanti, G. (1999). Local anaesthetic activity of the essential oil of Lavandula angustifolia. Planta medica, 65(8), 700-703.
  • Hajhashemi, V., Ghannadi, A., & Sharif, B. (2003). Anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of the leaf extracts and essential oil of Lavandula angustifolia Mill. Journal of ethnopharmacology, 89(1), 67-71.
  • Prabuseenivasan, S., Jayakumar, M., & Ignacimuthu, S. (2006). In vitro antibacterial activity of some plant essential oils. BMC complementary and alternative medicine, 6(1), 39.
  • Vakilian, K., Atarha, M., Bekhradi, R., & Chaman, R. (2011). Healing advantages of lavender essential oil during episiotomy recovery: a clinical trial. Complementary therapies in clinical practice, 17(1), 50-53.

 

ZINC OXIDE

  • Ågren, M. S., Chvapil, M., & Franzén, L. (1991). Enhancement of re-epithelialization with topical zinc oxide in porcine partial-thickness wounds. Journal of Surgical Research, 50(2), 101-105.
  • Baldwin, S., Odio, M. R., Haines, S. L., O'Connor, R. J., Englehart, J. S., & Lane, A. T. (2001). Skin benefits from continuous topical administration of a zinc oxide/petrolatum formulation by a novel disposable diaper. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, 15(s1), 5-11.
  • Cross, S. E., Innes, B., Roberts, M. S., Tsuzuki, T., Robertson, T. A., & McCormick, P. (2007). Human skin penetration of sunscreen nanoparticles: in-vitro assessment of a novel micronized zinc oxide formulation. Skin pharmacology and physiology, 20(3), 148-154.
  • Gamer, A. O., Leibold, E. V., & Van Ravenzwaay, B. (2006). The in vitro absorption of microfine zinc oxide and titanium dioxide through porcine skin. Toxicology in vitro, 20(3), 301-307.
  • Kumar, S., Lakshmanan, V. K., Raj, M., Biswas, R., Hiroshi, T., Nair, S. V., & Jayakumar, R. (2013). Evaluation of wound healing potential of β-chitin hydrogel/nano zinc oxide composite bandage. Pharmaceutical research, 30(2), 523-537.
  • STRÖMBERG, H. E., & Ågren, M. S. (1984). Topical zinc oxide treatment improves arterial and venous leg ulcers. British Journal of Dermatology, 111(4), 461-468.
  • Svedman, P. (1983). Irrigation treatment of leg ulcers. The Lancet, 322(8349), 532-534.
  • Zvyagin, A. V., Zhao, X., Gierden, A., Sanchez, W., Ross, J., & Roberts, M. S. (2008). Imaging of zinc oxide nanoparticle penetration in human skin in vitro and in vivo. Journal of biomedical optics, 13(6), 064031.